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Stealth ninja pwns CCHR promoter and child hater Meryl Dorey

Discussion in 'CoS Front Groups' started by Anonymous, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. Anonymous Member

    ^Kelly Preston.

    Some studies have shown an increase in neurons in the brains of autistic people, which is the opposite of what happens when a brain is injured by toxins.
  2. Anonymous Member

    By the way, there's a vaccine for shingles.
    http://www.wcsh6.com/news/article/213917/314/Doctors-say-shingles-vaccine-underused
    http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Over-60-Get-vaccinated-for-shingles-3822609.php
    Darwin.jpg
    Forum for people who want to park their kids in Darwin's waiting room:
    http://www.mothering.com/community/f/443/im-not-vaccinating
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Internetzin Member

    I thought shingles was residual inactive chicken pox springing to life when immune system becomes challenged?
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Anonymous Member

    Yes, and the vaccination powers up your immune system to knock it back dead again.
  5. Internetzin Member

    Wish I had known, shingles of pregnancy, around my eye, most excruciating pain I have ever felt in my life!
  6. Anonymous Member

    The chicken pox virus lives in the dorsal root ganglia in people who were once infected. Circulating antibodies keep it from replicating enough to cause problems. But when your immune system is suppressed, like when you're pregnant, the virus may become active again.

    The shingles vaccine is basically the chicken pox vaccine in a larger dose. It will provoke more antibodies in people who had chicken pox years ago and will help to prevent a shingles outbreak later.

    If you've had shingles already, find out if you can get the vaccine. A friend of mine had shingles around her eye three times.
  7. Internetzin Member

    God! Poor woman. Thanks for the info.
  8. Anonymous Member

  9. Anonymous Member

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  10. Anonymous Member

  11. anon walker Moderator

    Geezer sperms lead to autism?
    http://news.discovery.com/human/older-fathers-autism-120822.html

  12. Anonymous Member

  13. Random guy Member

    Shoddy article is shoddy, but at least the very presence of the test means there's progress in understanding what causes autism. Interesting that they came up with 237 genetic markers, my guess there are lots more. I would say chances are "autism" is not a single condition, but a host of related or similar ones.
  14. CJS

    I would say chances are very good you are correct - but there is definitely a genetic component. You sometimes see families where all the kids are somewhere on the spectrum, and these idiotic antivax morons blame it on vaccines instead of the genes they passed on. See, if it was vaccines it wasn't their fault, but if it is genetic, then they passed it on... and they wouldn't want to blame themselves (not that it is their "fault".... but you see where their logic is failing them).
    • Agree Agree x 2
  15. Cudgel Member


    I thought he was doing a good job.
    • Agree Agree x 2
  16. anonymous612 Member

    This thread is like herpes.

    Just when you think it's gone, it comes raging back for more happy fun times.
  17. Anonymous Member

    Holy crap!

    How to fake a vaccination record?

    I hope they catch her and bin her and her infectious spawn somewhere away from sane people.
  18. Anonymous Member

    http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/s3601416.htm
    From the transcript of the video at the above link:
    False balance leads to confusion

    Well, let’s move on. Another complaint to the ACMA came to our attention last week. A month ago, WIN TV in Wollongong aired a news story about a measles outbreak in South-West Sydney. It started off well enough:


    Michaela Gray: 40 cases in two and a half months, the Macarthur region is facing an outbreak of measles of worrying proportions. ...

    Dr Cathryn Archinal: as doctors we recommend that everyone is immunised.

    — WIN News Illawarra, 16th August, 2012

    But the doctor’s advice was then contradicted by this...


    Michaela Gray: There remains heated discussion about possible links between the jab and the development of autism.

    Meryl Dorey: All vaccinations in the medical literature have been linked with the possibility of causing autism, not just the measles/mumps/rubella vaccine.

    Michaela Gray: Choice groups are calling for greater research into the measles vaccine

    — WIN News Illawarra, 16th August, 2012

    ‘Choice groups’. They actually only quoted one group, which claims that it’s in favour of the public having a choice. But Meryl Dorey’s deceptively -named Australian Vaccination Network is in fact an obsessively anti-vaccination pressure group that’s immunised itself against the effect of scientific evidence.

    Dorey’s claim about the medical literature linking vaccination and autism is pure, unadulterated baloney.

    On our website is a long statement by the NSW Director of Health Protection, Dr Jeremy McAnulty. He says that...


    Any link between measles vaccine and autism has been conclusively discredited by numerous in-depth studies and reviews by credible experts, including the World Health Organisation, the American Academy of Paediatrics and the UK Research Council.

    — Dr Jeremy McAnulty, Director of Health Protection, NSW Health, 28th September, 2012

    The NSW Minister for Health, Jillian Skinner, told state parliament last week that ...


    The Australian Vaccination Network has not provided accurate information to parents about the risks and benefits of immunisation.)

    — NSW Parliament, Jillian Skinner, NSW Minister for Health, 26th September, 2012

    So why on earth, we asked WIN TV, did it include the AVN’s misleading claims in a news story about a measles outbreak?
    WIN TV couldn’t find time to answer that question. But it wrote this to a viewer who complained :


    The story presented was accurate, fair and balanced and presented the views of the medical practitioners and of the choice groups.

    — Shirley Brown, Group Business Director, 4th September, 2012

    Medical practitioners – choice groups. One opinion as valid as the other. It’s a classic example of what many – especially despairing scientists – call ‘false balance’ in the media. As the British Medical Journal put it last year in an editorial about the “debate” in the UK :


    the media’s insistence on giving equal weight to both the views of the anti-vaccine camp and to the overwhelming body of scientific evidence ...made people think that scientists themselves were divided over the safety of the vaccine, when they were not.

    — British Medical Journal, When balance is bias, Christmas Edition, 2011

    To put it bluntly, there’s evidence, and there’s bulldust. It’s a journalist’s job to distinguish between them, not to sit on the fence and bleat ‘balance’. Especially when people’s health is at risk.

    That’s my view. We’ll let you know what the ACMA rules some time next year.
  19. White Tara Global Moderator

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  20. anonsoldier Member

    What an utter horrible bitch.
    • Like Like x 2
  21. Anonymous Member

    Dead baby's family 'harassed' by anti-vax campaigners

    Alys Francis, ninemsn
    2:57pm May 26, 2013


    May 26, 2013: The government is taking action to boost vaccination rates, releasing a booklet to debunk the myths surrounding child immunisation.
    A NSW family says they have been harassed by anti-vaccination campaigners ever since their four-week-old daughter died of whooping cough four years ago.

    Toni and David McCaffery said they were targeted by campaigners after their baby Dana died in March 2009 and they chose to speak out about the importance of immunisation, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

    The couple said they had received abusive messages, anonymous letters and been targeted online ever since.

    Mrs McCaffery told the Sunday Telegraph "the lunacy and the venom directed at us has just been torture - it's frightening, abhorrent and insensitive in the extreme".

    "We were being told you're horrible and you'll kill other people, diminishing what my child went through, that she was weak anyway and it was natural selection," she said.

    The McCaffery's said they received numerous hateful messages via Dana's website, including one that said "harden the f--- up" and another that read: "I could walk through a ward of babies dying from whooping cough or any other infectious disease and it would not affect my decision to not vaccinate my children."

    The founder of anti-vaccination group Australian Vaccination Network (AVN), Meryl Dorey, also posted her own claims about the alleged dangers of vaccinations on Dana's memorial website.

    Despite the abuse, the couple said they are determined to keep campaigning to educate people about the important of vaccinations.

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national...mily-harassed-by-anti-vaccination-campaigners
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  22. Anonymous Member

    I am getting sick of the vitriolic nature of anti vaxers. The innapropriate use of the word rape in this context plays a small part in the continuation of rape culture.

    http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/he...port-vaccination/story-fneuzlbd-1226673433912

    Read more: http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/he...on/story-fneuzlbd-1226673433912#ixzz2Xvsf8FuJ
    • Like Like x 2
  23. Anonymous Member

  24. Anonymous Member

    http://ratbags.com/rsoles/index.html
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  25. Anonymous Member

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/health/2013/11/25/13/47/vaccination-sceptic-forced-to-change-name

    The Administrative Decisions Tribunal on Monday upheld a decision by Fair Trading, which called on the Australian Vaccination Network (AVN) to change its name as it was misleading.
    In handing down her decision on the network's appeal, Magistrate Nancy Hennessy said that while the network couldn't be classified as strictly "anti" vaccination, its main objective was to highlight the risks of vaccinations.
    "Without any information, other than the name, an ordinary member of the public would be likely to be misled into thinking that one of AVN's objectives is to give a pro-vaccination message or, at least, to provide comprehensive information about vaccination," she found.
    "That is not the case."
    The network should consider using a name that included "risk" or "sceptic", she suggested.
    President of the Australian Medical Association, AMA NSW Professor Brian Owler welcomed the decision, saying AVN's name incorrectly suggests to parents that they are accessing comprehensive, independent health advice.

    Ha Ha Ha so enjoyed this.
    • Like Like x 3
  26. The Internet Member

    Lulz. Finally those nutters are getting called out for their bs.
    • Like Like x 1
  27. Random guy Member

  28. DeathHamster Member

    I wish they wouldn't use skeptic. It has a long history of use for rational inquiry, but now it's being encroached on by moonbat conspiracy groups.
    • Like Like x 1
  29. The Internet Member

    I know right?

    But it's to be expected. Everything good gets hijacked by lazy people who just want to look good without putting in the effort to be good.
  30. Anonymous Member

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  31. Anonymous Member

    ^yup poor regulation equals poor outcomes
  32. JohnnyRUClear Member

    "Regulation" is an interesting word. One way to ensure "poor outcomes" is to hand control of decision-making over to people who pay no price for being wrong (AKA the state), which is what is usually meant by "regulation". Much better "regulation" will emerge from a free market, since providers who don't actually produce what they say end up going out of business -- automatically and peacefully.
    • Like Like x 1
  33. The Internet Member

    Thing is, you can't judge treatment outcomes without systems of data collection and statistics. That requires some standard way of reporting complex illness thingies, and ways to make sure the info is legit. So you need a big third party any way you slice it. It's not just buyer and seller.
  34. JohnnyRUClear Member

    Standards emerge, where needed, amongst people who interact. There's no need for coercion. A monopolistic "big third party" is just an invitation for corruption.
  35. The Internet Member

    Modern medicine began with the Flexner report. Before that, no standards and The Road to Wellville.
  36. DeathHamster Member

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  37. The Internet Member

    Chiropractors. Keeping America retarded with their bad advices, e-meters, and other contraptions, for over a hundred years.

    We have to put up with chiros because they own Tom Harkin, Dan Burton, and some other big names in Washington.



    At around 7:30 seconds you hear how Obamacare has secured a place for chiropractic --and by extension, other alternative providers such as Narconon-- forever within this country, and paid for by tax dollars.
    • Like Like x 3
  38. Anonymous Member

    • Like Like x 1
  39. JohnnyRUClear Member

    Nah, not forever. Only while the state lasts.
  40. White Tara Global Moderator

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