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Paedophile Rings in the System

Discussion in 'News and Current Events' started by futuretogether, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. New thread on Paedophile Rings in the System.

    Whitehall child sex inquiry: the 114 files 'lost’

    Home Office admits that it destroyed, lost or could not find 'potentially relevant files' between 1979 and 1999

    Leon-Brittan_2965652b.jpg
    The lost files are part of an investigation into the handling of a dossier about child abuse allegations presented to Leon Brittan, the former home secretary Photo: Rex

    By Patrick Sawer and Tim Ross
    9:00PM BST 05 Jul 2014

    The paedophile scandal engulfing Westminster deepened after the Home Office confessed to losing or destroying 114 “potentially relevant” files.
    The lost files are part of an investigation into the handling of a dossier about child abuse allegations presented to Leon Brittan, the former home secretary.
    Geoffrey_Dickens__2965851c.jpg
    Geoffrey Dickens with a booklet written by health visitors on how to spot the signs of child abuse (REX)
    The dossier, compiled by Geoffrey Dickens, the late Conservative MP, is said to implicate political figures at the heart of national life.
    A review by the Home Office last year into its handling of the dossier found that information it had received between 1979 and 1999 had been passed to the appropriate authorities.
    Related Articles


    But Mark Sedwill, permanent secretary to the Home Office, has now admitted for the first time that his department had destroyed, lost or simply “not found” 114 “potentially relevant files”
    He also said four new possible leads about child abuse have now been passed on to Scotland Yard. A Metropolitan Police spokesman said: "Any relevant material that is submitted to us will be dealt with as appropriate."
    A senior Tory MP and former children’s minister last night accused the Home Office of a cover-up. Now Theresa May, the Home Secretary, is under pressure to “get involved” in establishing what happened to the missing records. She will face demands in the House of Commons tomorrow to explain how her department came to lose the documents.
    In recent days fresh questions have emerged about whether enough was done to investigate the allegations.
    Mark-Sedwill_1787284c.jpg
    Mark Sedwill, the permanent secretary at the Home Office (EPA)
    Mr Sedwill wrote to David Cameron yesterday to say a new investigation would examine whether the conclusions of last year’s review “remain sound”.
    But in a separate letter to Keith Vaz, the home affairs select committee chairman, he outlined new details about the 2013 review, in which he made the admission about the 114 files.
    In his letter Mr Sedwill told Mr Vaz that Mr Dickens had submitted allegations of sexual offences over a number of years to several Home Secretaries, including Lord Brittan, rather than just one single dossier.
    He said the review had analysed a central database containing 746,000 files from the period 1979 to 1999 and had identified 527 potentially relevant files, from which nine items of information about alleged child abuse were reported to police.
    But Mr Sedwill said the same analysis of the central database “identified 114 potentially relevant files had been presumed destroyed, missing or not found”.
    The admission immediately raised further questions as to whether there was an attempt inside Whitehall to cover up the allegations raised by Mr Dickens when he submitted his dossier to Lord Brittan.
    Keith-Vaz_2965806c.jpg
    Keith Vaz has deep concerns about the loss of the 114 files (AFP/GETTY)
    Mr Vaz welcomed the decision to set up a new review of the Government’s handling of the cases but expressed deep concerns about the loss of so many files.
    “We obviously now realise that the first review was not fit for purpose,” Mr Vaz told The Sunday Telegraph. “But what concerns me is the line in the letter that talks about 114 files going missing, This is very disturbing. People will be extremely concerned. It is a huge amount of files about a very sensitive issue.
    “We really need to know who authorised it. How do we know such a precise figure? Somebody must have known that these 114 files existed and they must presumably know the date that they went missing or were destroyed.
    “We know the Home Office loses passports and a couple of files here or there but 114 is quite a lot of files to lose. I think we do need answers to this.
    “I hope Mrs May will have the answers because I am a little concerned at the absence of the Home Secretary from most of these deliberations over the last few days. This is the Home Office and she is the Home Secretary and it should be her setting up these reviews.”
    Mr Vaz, a former minister under Tony Blair, added: “This is a lot of material that has gone down the tubes. We need to know how this happened.”
    Tim Loughton, the Conservative MP and former children’s minister, said: “To lose one file is unfortunate but to lose 114 smacks of complete incompetence or, I fear, some degree of cover-up.
    “This just raises so many more questions which really must now be answered as a matter of urgency.”
    The Home Office said the original review was satisfied it had passed to the appropriate authorities information about child abuse which was “credible” and “had realistic potential for further investigation”.
    But it admitted that for the conclusions to “remain valid” a new examination of its work by a senior independent legal figure was now required.
    Mr Dickens, who died in 1995, told his family that details in his dossier would “blow the lid off” the lives of powerful and famous child abusers, his son said. Barry Dickens said his father would have been “hugely angered” that the allegations had not been properly investigated.
    Lord Brittan has confirmed he received a “substantial bundle of papers” from Mr Dickens when he was Home Secretary in 1983 and said he had passed them to his officials for investigation.
    Mrs May said on Friday she would “examine the case” for a public inquiry into historical child abuse in public life, for which 139 MPs have now called.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/pol...all-child-sex-inquiry-the-114-files-lost.html
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  2. Westminster 'Paedophile Ring': 'Powerful Elite' Of MPs And Ministers Abused Children, Peter McKelvie Says

    The Huffington Post UK/PA | Posted: 08/07/2014 07:52 BST

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    David Cameron, Mark Sedwill, Peter McKelvie, Theresa May, Theresa May, Canada News

    The alleged paedophile ring that had connections with Westminster included at least 20 prominent figures, including former MPs and government ministers, who abused children for decades, it has been claimed.
    After the Home Office announced a full inquiry into the ring and claims it failed to properly investigate it at the time, former child protection manager Peter McKelvie said that the ring were "a powerful elite" that included MPs and ministers at the time.
    McKelvie, whose allegations led initially to police investigation in 2012 into the ring, told the BBC: "I would say we are looking at upwards of 20 (people) and a much larger number of people who have known about it and done nothing about it, who were in a position to do something about it."
    He said the victims, who were "almost exclusively boys", were abused over "many, many years" and were moved around like "a lump of meat".
    o-PETER-MCKELVIE-570.jpg
    Peter McKelvie made the claims in an interview with the BBC
    McKelvie, whose allegations led initially to a 2012 police inquiry, said the ring carried out "the worst form" of abuse.
    He said: "I would say we are looking at upwards of 20 (people) and a much larger number of people who have known about it and done nothing about it, who were in a position to do something about it."

    He added: "I believe that there is strong evidence, and an awful lot of information that can be converted into evidence if it is investigated properly, that there's been an extremely powerful elite among the highest levels of the political classes for as long as I have been alive - I'm 65 now.
    "There's been sufficient reason to investigate it over and over again, certainly for the last 30 years, and there has always been the block and the cover-up and the collusion to prevent that happening.
    "For the first time I have got a belief that survivors will come forward and justice will be served for a lot of survivors, but unfortunately it has been left so late that a lot of the abusers are now dead."
    McKelvie added: "We are looking at the Lords, we are looking at the Commons, we are looking at the judiciary, we are looking at all institutions where there will be a small percentage of paedophiles and a slightly larger percentage of people who have known about it but have felt that in terms of their own self-interest and self-preservation and for political party reasons it's been safer for them to cover it up rather than deal with it."
    Meanwhile, the senior civil servant at the Home Office faces a grilling by MPs over allegations it mishandled the child abuse allegations.
    Permanent secretary Mark Sedwill will appear before the home affairs select committee today amid questions over the quality of a review he commissioned last year.
    NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless has been asked by Home Secretary Theresa May to look into the adequacy of the probe into the way claims were dealt with and the response of police and prosecutors to information which was passed on to them.
    Mrs May announced the move yesterday along with a wider independent inquiry into the handling of allegations of child sex abuse by state institutions as well as bodies such as the BBC, churches and political parties.
    The inquiry will be given access to all government papers it requests, and could be converted into a full public inquiry if its chairman feels it is necessary.
    It is unlikely to report before next year's general election, but Mrs May promised that an update on its progress will be given to Parliament before May 2015.
    o-THERESA-MAY-570.jpg
    Theresa May announced an inquiry into the handling of the allegations
    Prime Minister David Cameron promised to leave "no stone unturned" in seeking the truth about widespread allegations of a paedophile ring with links to the establishment in the 1980s.
    Mr Wanless is expected to report within eight to 10 weeks and will look at concerns that the Home Office failed to act on allegations of child sex abuse contained in a dossier handed over in by former Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens to then Home Secretary Leon Brittan in 1983
    Mrs May said she was confident that the work commissioned by Mr Sedwill was "carried out in good faith", but added that with "allegations as serious as these the public need to have complete confidence in the integrity of the investigation's findings".
    Last year's investigation found 13 items of information in Home Office files about alleged child abuse dating back to the period 1979-99, and passed police details of four of the items about which they were not already aware.
    But Mrs May told MPs that, while records of a number of letters from Mr Dickens were found, there was no sign of a "Dickens dossier".
    The investigation found that 114 potentially relevant files were not available, and were presumed "destroyed, missing or not found", although the independent investigator made clear that he found no evidence to suggest that the files had been removed or destroyed "inappropriately".
    Mr Wanless is also to examine that finding that public funds totalling almost £500,000 were given to two organisations with links to the notorious Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE).
    The Voluntary Services Unit (VSU) provided £65,750 to the Albany Trust between 1974 and 1980 and £410,500 to the Princedale Trust between 1974 and 1984.
    But an independent investigation commissioned by the Home Office following reports the VSU had funded PIE said that "no evidence was found to indicate that either organisation used this funding to support PIE".
    Mr Sedwill may also be questioned about claims a leading member of PIE used its premises to store material.
    According to the BBC, Steven Adrian Smith boasted in a little-seen book in 1986 that he had clearance to work as an electrical contractor at the Westminster building while chairman of PIE in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and hid files in locked cabinets there "where no police raid would ever have found them".
    Lord Brittan welcomed the announcement of the Wanless probe, and said in a statement that allegations that he failed to deal adequately with Mr Dickens's allegations as home secretary were "completely without foundation".
    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/201..._5565972.html?utm_hp_ref=canada&ir=Canada
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  3. The U.K. Political Pedophile Ring Scandal is Just The Tip of the Iceberg - The Full Story is Much More Disturbing [UPDATED]

    08.Jul.2014 | picture-1.png SCG
    Jimmy-Savile-UK-pedophile-ring-scandal.jpg
    The full scope of the political pedophile ring scandal in the U.K. can't be fully appreciated without looking at the other side of the Atlantic
    Numerous high ranking British politicians are being investigated for their involvement in an extensive pedophile ring, however the full scope of this scandal can't be fully appreciated without looking at the other side of the Atlantic
    It wasn't that long ago that those who claimed that there was a massive pedophile ring involving officials in the highest levels of government were written off as conspiracy theorists and kooks. That is no longer the case, at least in the U.K. It turns out that this so called conspiracy theory was true, and is finally being officially investigated. The coverup isn't going well at this point. The British government is even coming under heat for the convenient disappearance of key files regarding the allegations. At least forty British MPs are implicated, but this is really just the tip of the iceberg.
    The scandal, which initially centered around rape and child abuse accusations against the well connected BBC presenter (and knight) Jimmy Savile (who died in 2011) expanded in scope after victims testified that the abuse involved an organized pedophile ring which was operated out of the BBC. This organized pedophile ring apparently involved at least 40 British MPs. Another aspect of this scandal involves a close friend of Savile, former British MP Cyril Smith (also a knight). Police claim to have "overwhelming" evidence that Cyril physically abused young boys in the 1960s. It's worth noting that Savile wasn't just well connected, he was known to rub shoulders with the royal family itself.
    Whether those involved actually get brought to justice or not is another story altogether. It's too late to bring down Jimmy Savile and Cyril Smith. They're both dead already. The question now, is whether the rest of the ring will be prosecuted. This is a scandal that has been successfully suppressed for decades in spite of testimony from numerous victims. Indeed the BBC fired the reporter who first attempted to expose the abuse in 2012. Once you look at the profile of those involved it's easy to see why. This time however, the internet seems to be making it a bit harder to sweep under the rug.
    Regardless of how far the investigation goes officially, the fact that this nastiness is getting brought into the sunlight in England is a good thing. It establishes precedent, and opens up a range of possibilities that most people are unwilling to even consider until a story gets mainstream coverage. It might even prepare people psychologically for the full extent of this scandal.
    You think this high powered pedophilia network only operated in the U.K.? I've got news for you, the United States government has been covering up their own pedophile network for decades. As in the U.K. case, the evidence surfaced years ago but nothing was ever done.
    Exhibit A: This documentary was produced for the Discovery channel, but what it uncovered was so damaging that was never allowed to air in the U.S. Watch it and you'll understand why.

    Exhibit B: The thousands of Pentagon employees implicated in a child pornography sting operation. That case was mysteriously dropped and never mentioned again.

    Exhibit C: The NSA whistleblower Russel Tice exposed the fact that news organizations, the State Department, high ranking military officials and members of Congress and the Senate were being spied on extensively for years. (This may seem unrelated at first, but listen carefully to what Tice says, and consider the implications.)

    Put it all together and and a very ominous picture emerges.
    Each and every one of these predators are compromised in such a way, that whoever holds evidence that could expose them, would have total control over their actions. You would own them.
    We generally think of blackmail as a means of extracting money, but to have the goods on a senator, an MP or a president is far more valuable. If you have the political elite, media, and the intelligence agencies under your thumb, anything is possible.
    This is how you create puppets that are willing to start wars for you.
    UPDATE: Just to give you an idea of how widespread this problem is, take a look at this video:

  4. Children's homes were 'supply line' for paedophiles, says ex-minister

    Lord Warner says an inquiry he conducted in 1992 showed how children's homes were targeted by powerful people

    Link to video: Miliband: 'government slow and piecemeal' over child abuse inquiry
    Powerful people in the 1980s targeted children's homes that served as a "supply line" for paedophiles, a former health minister has claimed.
    As a former child protection manager warned that a "powerful elite" of at least 20 prominent figures carried out the "worst form of abuse", the former health minister Lord Warner described the sexual abuse of children as a "power drive".
    Warner, a health minister in 2003-07 who conducted an inquiry into child abuse in Birmingham in 1992, spoke out after the home secretary, Theresa May, announced a national inquiry into how the authorities may have ignored child abuse at Westminster.
    The Labour leader, Ed Miliband, said the government's approach had been dilatory and piecemeal. He said: "The inquiry needs to recommend child protection measures for the future. If the government does all those things, we will support them."
    He said: "They have been slow and piecemeal getting to this point. I think victims and others need to be able to give testimony and give their evidence.
    "It is vital that the inquiry is sufficiently comprehensive and over-arching. The important thing is to get at the truth to get at justice, to get what happened in institutions, and to get the right answers for the future. The appalling examples of child protection abuse we have seen must never be allowed to happen again."
    MPs on the home affairs select committee will question Mark Sedwill, the home office's permanent secretary, on Tuesday afternoon over the loss of 114 potentially relevant files on child abuse dating back to the 1980s.
    Lord-Warner-011.jpg Lord Warner, the former health minister. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian
    Warner said his inquiry in 1992 showed how children's homes were targeted by powerful paedophiles. He told the Today programme on BBC Radio 4: "Some of these children's homes were targeted by people in power, powerful people. Indeed, sexual abuse of children is a power drive. That's what a lot of it is about.
    "It is possible that people who were authoritative, powerful in particular communities did sometimes have access to children's homes. We know for historical purposes that children's homes were a supply line sometimes."
    Warner, a director of social services in Kent in the 1980s, said insufficient action was taken to deal with child abuse in that decade because there was "disbelief in the public mind".
    He said: "It is pretty distasteful stuff. Society has found it difficult to come to terms with this … We still had an air of deference about people in authority.
    "A cover-up means something is very organised. I think much more of this is about people being insensitive to some of these concerns and not being as preoccupied with protecting vulnerable people – children and adults."
    Peter McKelvie, a former child protection manager whose allegations about child abuse led to a police inquiry in 2012, claimed that at least 20 prominent people abused children.
    McKelvie told BBC2's Newsnight: "I believe that there is strong evidence – and an awful lot of information that can be converted into evidence if it is investigated properly – that there has been an extremely powerful elite amongst the highest levels of the political classes for as long as I am alive, and I am 65.
    "There has been sufficient reason to investigate it over and over again, certainly for the last 30 years. There has always been the block and the cover-up and the collusion to prevent that happening."
    He added: "For the first time I have got a belief that survivors will come forward and justice will be served for a lot of survivors. Unfortunately it has been left so late that a lot of the abusers are now dead.
    "We are looking at the Lords, we are looking at the Commons, we are looking at the judiciary, we are looking at all institutions where there will be a small percentage of paedophiles and a slightly larger percentage of people who have known about it but have felt that in terms of their own self-interest and self-preservation and for political party reasons it's been safer for them to cover it up rather than deal with it."
    McKelvie, who served as a child protection manager in Hereford and Worcester, worked on the conviction of Peter Righton, a founding member of the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE). Righton, who has since died, was convicted of importing child pornography. McKelvie told police in 2012 that West Mercia police had seven boxes of evidence including letters between Righton and other alleged paedophiles.
    On Monday, May told the Commons she was establishing a public inquiry into how complaints of sexual abuse were treated, and sometimes ignored, in public bodies over several decades.
    Ministers had been holding out against such a sweeping inquiry, but, facing charges of an establishment cover-up, succumbed and promised there would be no no-go areas for the investigation.
    The inquiry will be able to examine the files of the security services and allegations that the Tory whips' office in the 1970s may have suppressed allegations of child abuse by members of the parliamentary party. It is also expected to take some evidence from victims.
    Labour MPs pointed to a 1985 BBC documentary in which a former government whip between 1970 and 1973 said the Tory whips' office, when faced by an MP involved in "a scandal with small boys", would get him out of trouble, partly so the MP then felt obliged in the future to carry out the bidding of the whips.
    May said she would look at plans, backed in principle by the Labour MP Tom Watson, to require public servants to report allegations of child abuse to officials in a form of mandatory whistleblowing. A duty to report would place some form of culpability on a public official if they knowingly withheld information concerning suspected child abuse.
    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jul/08/children-homes-supply-line-paedophiles-lord-warner
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  5. Baroness Butler-Sloss hid claims of bishop's sex abuse

    The former judge appointed to investigate allegations of an establishment cover-up of child sex abuse kept allegations about a bishop out of the public domain because the 'press would love a bishop'

    Baroness-Butler-Sl_2968609b.jpg
    One child protection expert said Baroness Butler-Sloss' involvement in the ruling had the unintended consequence of allowing paedophiles to get away with their crimes. Photo: PA

    Alice_Philipson_2441739a.jpg
    By Alice Philipson
    12:04AM BST 12 Jul 2014


    The retired judge appointed to lead the Government's major review of child sex abuse allegations kept allegations about a bishop out of a report on a paedophile scandal because she "cared about the Church", it has emerged.
    Baroness Butler-Sloss told a victim of alleged abuse that she did not want to include the claims because "the press would love a bishop".
    It comes days after Lady Butler-Sloss was forced to apologise for "inaccuracies" in a previous inquiry into two paedophile priests.
    Bishop Ball, 82, the former Bishop of Lewes and Bishop of Gloucester, was charged this year with indecent assault offences and misconduct in a public office.
    During a meeting at the House of Lords in 2011, Lady Butler-Sloss told Phil Johnson that she would "prefer not to refer to him" because he was "very old now" and she wanted the focus of any press coverage to be two priests who were prolific abusers - one of whom was dead and the other in prison.
    Related Articles
    She said she would mention the allegations in a private report to the Archbishop of Cantebury instead, according to The Times.
    Mr Johnson, who was abused by a number of clergymen when he was a choirboy in the Church of England Diocese of Chichester and now sits on a National Safeguarding Panel for the Church, kept a detailed record of the meeting. He said he "felt pressured to agree to exclude information about the bishop from the report".
    Simon Danczuk, the Labour MP who exposed the extent of Cyril Smith’s child sex offences, said "there is information coming out by the day which suggests she [Lady Butler-Sloss] is unsuitable for the role".
    The peer previously made crucial errors during an investigation into how the Church of England handled the cases of two ministers in Sussex who had sexually abused boys.
    Eight months after her report was published Lady Butler-Sloss had to issue a six-page addendum in which she apologised for “inaccuracies” which, she admitted, arose from her failure to corroborate information which was given to her by senior Anglican figures as part of the inquiry.
    Lady Butler-Sloss said she had always tried to be "fair and compassionate" and had "never put the reputation of any institution, including the Church of England, above the pursuit of justice for vicitms".
    A Home Office spokesman said: “The integrity of Baroness Butler-Sloss is beyond reproach and we stand by her appointment unreservedly.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukn...er-Sloss-hid-claims-of-bishops-sex-abuse.html
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  6. A.O.T.F Member

    The thousands of Pentagon employees implicated in a child pornography sting operation.

    114 files 'lost’

    Lady Butler-Sloss had to issue a six-page addendum in which she apologised for “inaccuracies” which, she admitted, arose from her failure to corroborate information which was given to her by senior Anglican figures as part of the inquiry.

    there is information coming out by the day which suggests she [Lady Butler-Sloss] is unsuitable for the role


    Put it all together and and a very ominous picture emerges.
    Each and every one of these predators are compromised in such a way, that whoever holds evidence that could expose them, would have total control over their actions. You would own them.
    We generally think of blackmail as a means of extracting money, but to have the goods on a senator, an MP or a president is far more valuable. If you have the political elite, media, and the intelligence agencies under your thumb, anything is possible.
    This is how you create puppets that are willing to start wars for you.

    The Home Office

    7 April 2012 :eek:
  7. Not signing in here for obvious reasons.

    What they want to hide is who got caught up in the Wonderland Trials and is still walking free.
  8. yes its rampant! they use it to control the politicians to do their bidding.

    'We can't prove sex with children does them harm' says Labour-linked NCCL

    EVIDENCE has emerged that the views of the Paedophile Information Exchange influenced policy-making at the National Council for Civil Liberties when it was run by former Labour Health Secretary Patricia Hewitt.

    By: James Murray & James Fielding
    Published: Sun, March 2, 2014

    patricia_hewitt-462604.jpg Patricia Hewitt described the NCCL as 'naive and wrong' [STUART MASON]
    PIE members were lobbying NCCL officials for the age of consent to be reduced and campaigning for “paedophile love”.
    Their view that children were not harmed by having sex with adults appears to have been adopted by those at the top of the civil liberties group.
    Today we publish extracts from an NCCL report written for the Criminal Law Revision Committee in 1976 when Mrs Hewitt was general secretary.
    It says: “Where both partners are aged 10 or over, but under 14, a consenting sexual act should not be an offence. As the age of consent is arbitrary, we propose an overlap of two years on either side of 14.
    “Childhood sexual experiences, willingly engaged in, with an adult result in no identifiable damage.
    “The Criminal Law Commission should be prepared to accept the evidence from follow-up research on child ‘victims’ which show there is little subsequent effect after a child has been ‘molested’.
    “The real need is a change in the attitude which assumes that all cases of paedophilia result in lasting damage.
    “The present legal penalties are too high and reinforce the misinformation and prejudice. The duty of the court should be to inquire into all the relevant circumstances with the intention, not of meting out severe punishment, but of determining the best solution in the interests of both child and paedophile.”
    Mrs Hewitt, 65, was general secretary between 1974 and 1983. After days of intense pressure, the former Labour MP for Leicester West finally admitted last week the NCCL was “naive and wrong” over its ties to PIE.
    Where both partners are aged 10 or over, but under 14, a consenting sexual act should not be an offence
    The NCCL Report
    She said: “Any suggestion that I supported or condoned the vile crimes of child abusers is completely untrue.
    “As the NCCL archives demonstrate, I consistently distinguished between consenting relationships between homosexual men, on the one hand, and the abuse of children on the other.
    “When Jack Dromey, as NCCL chairman in 1976, vigorously opposed PIE at the NCCL AGM, he did so with the full support of the executive committee and myself as general secretary.”
    However Labour MP Dromey’s opposition to PIE has been questioned by its former chairman, convicted paedophile Tom O’Carroll, who claims he felt “welcome” at NCCL meetings where he sat on the gay rights sub-committee.
    Mr O’Carroll said: “While they did not like PIE and did nothing to support our objectives, they were afraid of appearing insufficiently ‘right on’.
    “Consequently they were nothing like as strenuous and public in their efforts to distance themselves from PIE as they are now claiming.
    “Dromey is quoted as saying ‘I was at the forefront of repeated public condemnations of PIE and their despicable views’. That’s news to me. Maybe by ‘public’ he meant imprecations muttered to cronies at his local pub.”
    Dromey’s wife Harriet Harman, deputy leader of the Labour party, was legal officer at the NCCL between 1978 and 1982. She has expressed her “regret” over the NCCL’s involvement with PIE but has pointedly declined to apologise.
    Related articles

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/46...ildren-does-them-harm-says-Labour-linked-NCCL
  9. yes your totally right!

    thats why we should not be listening to the corrupted. We got to help the kids somehow.
  10. new info...

    UK police arrest 660 suspected paedophiles


    Guardian / 16 July, 2014

    More than 600 suspected paedophiles, including doctors and teachers, have been arrested across Britain after a six-month investigation led by the National Crime Agency.

    The agency, dubbed Britain's FBI, announced on Wednesday it had arrested 660 suspected child abusers and taken more than 400 children into care in the first nationwide investigation of its kind.

    Of the 660 arrested, 39 were registered sex offenders but the vast majority of suspected paedophiles were off the police's radar. Those arrested include doctors, teachers, scout leaders, care workers and former police officers.

    The operation, which had remained secret until Wednesday, targeted people accessing indecent images of children online.

    Phil Gormley, the NCA deputy director general, said: "This is the first time the UK has had the capability to coordinate a single targeted operation of this nature.

    "Over the past six months we have seen unprecedented levels of cooperation to deliver this result."

    One of those arrested and subsequently charged was a doctor who allegedly kept more than 1m images of child abuse on his computers and had arranged to meet boys.

    In another case, a foster carer with no previous convictions or allegations of offending was caring for a vulnerable child when he was arrested. Four computers and one phone have been seized by police and the suspect has attempted serious self-harm, detectives said.

    Gormley said the police operation was about influencing potential offenders before they "cross the line" from accessing indecent images to directly sexually abusing children.

    "Our aim was to protect children who were victims of, or might be at risk of, sexual exploitation. A child is victimised not only when they are abused and an image is taken. They are re-victimised every time that image is viewed by someone," he said.

    "We want those offenders to know that the internet is not a safe anonymous space for accessing indecent images, that they leave a digital footprint, and that law enforcement will find it."

    Chief constable Simon Bailey, the national policing lead for child protection and abuse investigations, said the vast majority of forces in England and Wales were dealing with an unprecedented increase in the number of reports of child sexual abuse.

    He said: "Sexual abuse is a complex crime taking many forms. Forces are investigating exploitation of children and young people by groups and gangs, non-recent abuse including large-scale investigations into abuse in institutions over many years and sexusal abuse by parents and family members. [Read More]
  11. Police Need Amnesty To Speak Out on Westminster 'Paedo Network'

    The Huffington Post UK
    Posted: 16/07/2014 08:15 BST Updated: 16/07/2014 08:59 BST
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    n-HOUSE-OF-COMMONS-large570.jpg


    Former police officers should be given an amnesty to allow them to speak out without fear about what they knew of paedophile networks operating in Westminster three decades ago, an ex-Special Branch officer has said.
    Chris Hobbs, who spent 32 years with the Metropolitan Police, said retired colleagues should be given protection to encourage them to reveal what they had learned and that many would be carefully considering the consequences of speaking out about what they knew of the allegations.
    Hobbs told Sky News it was clear that "quite a few" officers, from the rank of commissioner and chief constable down to detectives, would know something about allegations of child abuse among politicians three decades ago.
    He said that an amnesty would be the only way to encourage former officers to come forward and speak out.
    Hobbs said: "I think it would help, it would help set officers' minds at rest if there was some form of protection there for them, that they weren't suddenly going to subject to the criminal investigations for possibly just doing what they were told.
    "I suspect there will be a substantial number of police officers, not huge numbers, but a substantial number that will know something and will be thinking to themselves, 'Shall I come forward, dare I risk it, or if I keep my head down will the storm pass me by?'."
    Widespread allegations of child abuse among establishment figures in the 1980s have prompted a formal inquiry, and Hobbs said "every police officer in London" at the time had heard rumours about Cyril Smith, the late Rochdale MP named as one of the abusers of young boys.
    Peter Garsden, president of the Association of Child Abuse Lawyers, said the creation of an amnesty would require great care.
    He told Sky News: "It depends what they are being given an amnesty against - if it is an intention to pervert the course of justice then that is fine. However, if they are part of a paedophile ring that involves the MPs then one does not want to let them off a criminal prosecution, nor would it be fair to do so."
  12. The Wrong Guy Member

    VIP paedophile networks 'shut down police investigations which got too close', retired officers claim

    By Nick Dorman, Mirror Online

    High-level probes into VIP paedophile networks were shut down as police closed in on a number of powerful figures, former officers claim.

    In an extraordinary development, detectives have turned whistleblower to expose how undercover operations were suddenly “canned”.

    Almost 30 officers have been venting their anger online – heaping pressure on the probe by Scotland Yard and the Government into widespread claims of historic sexual abuse.

    One former officer called Jim wrote: “This is about kids being raped by those in power that included politicians of all sorts. “It goes to the very heart of our establishment.”

    The allegations surfaced during a four-month investigation by the Exaro news website into a secret members-only chat forum used by former and serving Metropolitan Police officers.

    Use of the locked forum is vetted so that only people who have worked in or closely alongside the force can join or see the discussions.

    Along with the officers and a sixth man – a government worker who signed the Official Secrets Act – a further 11 policemen claimed colleagues had told them of similar cover-ups.

    One, who said his investigation into a paedophile ring was shut down, claimed: “As the operation expanded up the greasy pole of high society, the job got canned.”

    Continued here:
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/vip-paedophile-networks-shut-down-4807293

    Protected: paedophile MPs and ‘prominent people’, say police | ExaroNews

    http://www.exaronews.com/articles/5429/protected-paedophile-mps-and-prominent-people-say-police

    Police privately admit ‘cover-up’ for paedophile MPs and VIPs | ExaroNews

    http://www.exaronews.com/articles/5428/police-privately-admit-cover-up-for-paedophile-mps-and-vips
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Old_Coder Member

    JESUS!! My sad bag is now full. WTF is wrong with people?

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