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Narconon of Oklahoma Inc. / Riggs Abney Neal Turpen Orbison & Lewis Law Firm and Lobbyist

Discussion in 'Narconon' started by patriot75, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. patriot75 Member

    Earlier incarnation of HB 2101

    Friday, March 17, 2006

    First Bill in House GOP Faith-Based Initiative Passes Committee
    NOTE: For audio of Rep. Cargill on the House GOP Faith-Based Initiative go to: http://www.okhouse.gov//OkhouseMedia/audio.aspx
    CONTACT:
    Damon Gardenhire, press secretary
    Speaker Todd Hiett
    Oklahoma House of Representatives
    Capitol: (405) 962.7679
    gardenhire@okhouse.gov


    First Bill in House GOP Faith-Based Initiative Passes Committee
    OKLAHOMA CITY (Feb. 14, 2006) – The first measure in the House Republican faith-based initiative passed its first legislative test today.

    Authored by Rep. Lance Cargill, House Bill 3037, the Restorative Justice Act of 2006, will establish new incentives for expanded partnerships between prison officials and faith-based & community groups. The bill passed the Corrections and Criminal Justice Committee today, and now goes to the full House for a vote.
    “Our state government must reach out to churches and faith communities, enlisting their help,” said Rep. Cargill, Majority Floor Leader, who conducted an interim study and held hearings to develop the HB 3037 plan.
    “These groups are in the trenches every day. They know how to help people and change hearts.”

    HB 3037 is a key element in a three-part faith-based initiative announced by House GOP leaders last week. Other measures include a charitable tax credit (House Bill 3122, authored by Speaker Todd Hiett and co-authored by Rep. Brian Bingman, R-Sapulpa) and an effort to help compulsive gamblers (House Bill 2048, authored by Rep. Thad Balkman, R-Norman)

    “Oklahoma’s faith-based programs act as one of our greatest resources in confronting social problems and reaching out to those in need,” said Speaker Hiett (R-Kellyville). “These groups play a vital role in our communities, offering help that government simply can’t provide.”
    Cargill said the incentives in HB 3037 would seek to lower repeat offender rates by preparing inmates for life beyond prison walls before they are released. The HB 3037 plan has four main elements:

    • Tying recidivism rates to the evaluation of Oklahoma’s prison system.

    • Ensuring that corrections facilities recruit and welcome volunteers and establish partnerships with faith-based and community groups to provide services.

    • Coordinating re-entry programs to help inmates find jobs, housing, substance abuse treatment, medical care and mental health services.

    • Establishing collaboration among private and public sectors to connect inmates to employment opportunities and ser-vices before release.

    HB 3037 would also create two seed funds:
    * The Reintegration of Inmates Revolving Fund, would provide seed money to volunteer organizations that provide health, vocational and educational training.
    * The Restorative Justice Revolving Fund would offer bonuses to corrections officials who demonstrate improvement in recidivism rates for inmates previously under custody of DOC.
    http://sd2cx1.webring.org/l/rd?ring...6/03/first-bill-in-house-gop-faith-based.html
  2. Anonymous Member

    http://www.doc.state.ok.us/treatment/programs/index.html
  3. Anonymous Member

    Once people in the criminal justice system start accepting copyrighted materials with a licensing fee and little peer review, the treatment environment becomes easy pickings for cults like Scientology.
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/...rs-990-tax-returns.104444/page-6#post-2173243
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Anonymous Member

    More on the guy behind Thinking for a Change (T4C):

    This does not look like peer reviewed science to me. More like one dude's inspirational blather. Why do we want to make Mr. Maxwell rich, when we could be funding peer reviewed inquiry at our universities?
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Anonymous Member

    Anything with the word "transformation" or "leadership" in it is usually cancer.
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Anonymous Member

    index-1.gif
  7. Anonymous Member

  8. Anonymous Member

    More on John Maxwell, one of the guys who convinced our government he knows how to change the way criminals think.




    Therapy is pretty much therapy. The therapist must be more active and supportive when working with clients who lack important skills and more carefully reflective and reserved with higher functioning clients who can do things for themselves. All the major schools of thought that dominated psychotherapy up until the 1980s or so have their own language for saying basically this.

    Meanwhile in business schools and marketing departments across the US, another psychology tradition has grown up without the benefit of the broad based peer review within academic departments. These are the people who coach you and train you and inspire you with their NYT best sellers.

    Within academic psychology programs there has been a gradual convergence toward principles that stand out in many settings.

    But within the evil manipulative psychology taught in business programs and some professional schools, there's a friggin' therapy ap for everything. There's a therapy for PTSD, for eating disorders in young females, for reactive attachment disorder, for blacks, for Asians, for autism, for Asperger's, for criminals, for drinkers, for meth heads, for people going through divorce, and on and on and on. Specialization carries the implicit message of expertise and the appearance of expertise is important to people who don't know how much they don't know.
    • Like Like x 1
  9. patriot75 Member

    Holy Smoke!
    http://www.holysmoke.org/narconon/narconon-not-honored-tulsa.htm
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Anonymous Member

    Medical Marijuana Legislation Introduced in Oklahoma Legislature

    Senator Constance Johnson (D-Oklahoma District 28) has reintroduced legislation to allow patients with qualifying conditions to use cannabis for therapeutic purposes.
    Senate Bill 710 would allow qualifying patients to use cannabis with a physician's recommendation. Patients would be permitted to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana and cultivate up to twelve marijuana plants. SB 710 would also allow the state to license marijuana dispensaries and cultivation centers. You can read the full text of this proposal here. You can read NORML's support of this legislative effort here.
    NORML will continue to update you in the coming weeks as this proposal moves forward. You can learn more about this legislation from Oklahoma NORML and Tulsa NORML.
    http://capwiz.com/norml2/issues/alert/?alertid=62348741
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Anonymous Member

    Nice pooning!
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Anonymous Member

    [IMG]


    http://www.riggsabney.com/attorneys/m_david_riggs.aspx
    [IMG]

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