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Essay on the UN and human rights

Discussion in 'Think Tank' started by Anonymous, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Anonymous Member

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS
    Important milestones in the evolution of human rights include (but are not limited to): the Babylonic Code of Hammurabi, dating back to 1772 B.C.; Cyrus the Great’s Cyrus cylinder, issued in 539 B.C; the Constitution of Medina, drafted by Mohammad in 662 A.D.; the Magna Carta, (1215); John Locke’s theories on human rights and the subsequent English Bill of Rights (1689); the United States Declaration of Independence (1776),United States Constitution (1787) and Bill of Rights (completed in 1789 and ratified in 1791); Henry David Thoreau’s treatise On the Duty of Civil Disobedience (1849); Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, the League of Nations (1919-46), and the United Nations (1946-present).

    EVOLUTION AND HUMAN RIGHTS
    When a new organization comes into existence, there are always those conservatives who fear potential changes; they accept the current system—the “status quo,” if we’re willing to use clichéd terminology—as right or at least tolerable, and these people and organizations constitute a formidable barrier to change. This is not to say that possible changes shouldn’t be scrutinized for defects—as humans, for example, we have cells whose purposes include the moderate change. Without these cells, mutations in the reproduction of cells would lead to far more incidences of cancer. However, changes—that is, mutations—provide the basis of the progression of life and, in particular, our innate drive to survive.
    The example of cancer pertains to microscopic systems, but the same “instincts” live drives “systems of systems,” in higher-level organizations: as in the aforementioned case concerning cancer, an organization’s drives are to live and evolve into more perfect organizational systems. And, as such, degenerative mutative systems in these systems of systems must be neutralized by the supersystem itself. Conversely, there must be subsystems that encourage the propagation of other, evolutionarily beneficial, mutative systems.
    If we are to summarize the nature of human rights, the basic tenets are these:
    · “Do unto others as they would have you do unto you.” (I would amend this: “Do unto others what you would have them do unto you if you were in their shoes.”)
    ·
    All humans (I would amend this, too, to say “All sentient beings”) have the rights to life, liberty, property, and privacy.

    THE LATEST EVOLUTIONARY PROGRESSION
    The United Nations (UN) replaced the League of Nations in 1945 after World War II; now, all 193 internationally recognized sovereign nations (with the exception of Vatican City) are members of its constituency. The UN was formed in order to facilitate:
    · cooperation in international law;

    · international security;

    · economic development;

    · social progress;

    · human rights; and

    · world peace


    THE UNITED NATIONS AND THE FUTURE OF INDIVIDUAL AND NATIONAL RIGHTS
    While I claim that the UN represents the newest and potentially most powerful advocate for human rights the world has ever seen, I am not advocating the demise of national and local governments; these would still exist and have the power to create their own legislation; however, being only systems within systems, they have no legitimate claims as the sole proprietor of an understanding of universal human rights. These institutions and organizations must be held accountable by an emergent system—in this case, the UN. This is not to say that the UN, itself, can claim ownership of any sort of complete understanding of human rights; however, as it integrates the information contained in those subsystems, it is the best judge we currently have. And, nurtured correctly, it has the potential for vast improvement. This process will involve many individual steps, and the proper order of events must be carefully considered.

    KEYS TO THE EVOLUTION AND MAINTENANCE OF HUMAN RIGHTS
    While humans are basically good in that they tend to do what is “right” according to their perspectives on morality, cultural institutions have the capacity for malignance and, as we are influenced to an indeterminate degree by these institutions, the “moral” codes we develop and adhere to are susceptible to perversion. This leads individuals and organizations, all too frequently, to harm other individuals and organizations that also possess the natural rights to life, liberty, property, and privacy—inasmuch as the manifestation of these rights do no harm to others or, more generally, the common good.
    Conflict arises from either an individual’s or an organization’s belief in its superiority (moral or otherwise), or from perceived inequity in human rights (among other perceptions—such as those concerning economic inequity—which I plan to address in subsequent essays). To ensure the security of every individual’s or organization’s rights, a universal and equitable set of rules must be established—rules applied universally.
    In my next post (the full essay is too long), I'll enumerate, in no particular order, necessary actions the UN must take.

    1.
  2. Anonymous Member

    INSTITUTE JUST PENALTIES FOR CRIMES: Creating laws concerning infringements on human rights (misdemeanors, threats, kidnapping, rape, torture, and murder) must be a priority, and these laws must be applied in each and every case on micro and macro levels. These laws must enhance the common good without impeding autonomy except in the cases of the aforementioned situations. And in each case, a morally sound, rational, and practical remedy must be sought.

    2. ERADICATE THE DEATH PENALTY: Many espouse execution as a practical fix for the more severe of these crimes. However, life is the single most essential human right—as the others cannot be exercised without it—and, as such, execution (murder) should be seen as the most reprehensible. Meanwhile, the solution that least violates the perpetrator’s rights while maintaining the rights of others must be instituted. To institute a death penalty—in any situation—is its own form of murder. Additionally, for the death penalty to be carried out, somebody must pull the trigger—there is always an individual or organization ultimately responsible for carrying out the murder. As such, it logically follows that the secondary murderer should be murdered by a tertiary party, and this process should be applied ad infinitum. In such a case, there would, ultimately, be no such thing as human rights, because there would no individuals or organizations to possess them. Proper responses to crimes include attempts to rehabilitate the perpetrator or, if necessary, to imprison him. This ethic applies to all crimes. As such, the most severe penalty must be life imprisonment. This is not universally accepted as just response but, it should be noted that, in each of these “eye for an eye” cases, the underlying motivation is not justice or morality but, rather, vindictiveness.

    3. ENHANCE WELL-BEING UNIVERSALLY: Another means by which to avoid conflict and the infringement of human rights is to establish a basic standard of living to be applied to each and every constituent of the supersystem. That is to say, every entity within the supersystem must be given the opportunity to not only survive but also to thrive. This means that whenever a subsystem flounders, it is the responsibility of the supersystem (the UN) to provide amelioration.

    4. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: To deter military and/or economic conflict between any two states within the UN, there must be a mutual non-aggression pact. And this pact must include a clause committing each member state to join in a military/economic coalition against the aggressor. In a situation wherein an act of aggression by one subsystem against another, the former relinquishes must be seen to have breached the social contract it has entered into and must be met with the retaliation of the supersystem. In such a case, the subsystem’s continued existence rests on its willingness to stop working against the supersystem.


    [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations
  3. Anonymous Member

    what a boor
  4. Anonymous Member

    Is that really an essay cause it appears to be more in outline form then essay form.
  5. Anonymous Member

  6. Anonymous Member

    most important 25:00 - end
  7. Agreed, this is exactly an outline form. Essay's usually consist of just paragraphs. :p
  8. Jo_Qc Member

    Anyway, good post but UN as to be "enforced" in some kind of way for it to "matter" locally, and before that must be made transparent and accessible to all global citizens... But i agree that a "global overseer" (righteous one, for if it is not it'll lose it's legitimacy) is needed to regulate many things, but more so to be a source of info and data to the globe, data from everywhere... Hopefully most of globe embraces democraty, and for a healthy democracy to be fully legitimate you have to give the voters true info, data, consequences of actions undertook by gov. Etc.... But i have a project that i would like all members to examine for i am no scripter or web guy, it's thought for Quebec but could be applied anywhere else... I'll post it in "projects"... Have a good day!
  9. Anonymous Member

    Anyway, good post but UN as to be "enforced" in some kind of way for it to "matter" locally, and before that must be made transparent and accessible to all global citizens... But i agree that a "global overseer" (righteous one, for if it is not it'll lose it's legitimacy) is needed to regulate many things, but more so to be a source of info and data to the globe, data from everywhere... Hopefully most of globe embraces democraty, and for a healthy democracy to be fully legitimate you have to give the voters true info, data, consequences of actions undertook by gov. Etc.... But i have a project that i would like all members to examine for i am no scripter or web guy, it's thought for Quebec but could be applied anywhere else... I'll post it in "projects"... Have a good day!
  10. Jo_Qc Member

    Anyway, good post but UN as to be "enforced" in some kind of way for it to "matter" locally, and before that must be made transparent and accessible to all global citizens... But i agree that a "global overseer" (righteous one, for if it is not it'll lose it's legitimacy) is needed to regulate many things, but more so to be a source of info and data to the globe, data from everywhere... Hopefully most of globe embraces democraty, and for a healthy democracy to be fully legitimate you have to give the voters true info, data, consequences of actions undertook by gov. Etc.... But i have a project that i would like all members to examine for i am no scripter or web guy, it's thought for Quebec but could be applied anywhere else... I'll post it in "projects"... Have a good day!
  11. Jo_Qc Member

    Anyway, good post but UN as to be "enforced" in some kind of way for it to "matter" locally, and before that must be made transparent and accessible to all global citizens... But i agree that a "global overseer" (righteous one, for if it is not it'll lose it's legitimacy) is needed to regulate many things, but more so to be a source of info and data to the globe, data from everywhere... Hopefully most of globe embraces democraty, and for a healthy democracy to be fully legitimate you have to give the voters true info, data, consequences of actions undertook by gov. Etc.... But i have a project that i would like all members to examine for i am no scripter or web guy, it's thought for Quebec but could be applied anywhere else... I'll post it in "projects"... Have a good day!
  12. Anonymous Member

    The UN LOL

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