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Bradley Manning hearing on December 16 at Fort Meade

Discussion in 'Wikileaks' started by The Wrong Guy, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. The Wrong Guy Member

    From Twitter:

    issylvia this.is sylvia
    The hearing for Bradley #Manning will begin on December 16, one day before his birthday. t.co/8BUOSbOP #wikileaks
    9 minutes ago

    Quoted from http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-bradley-manning-20111121,0,6030503.story

    WikiLeaks suspect Bradley Manning to get hearing at Fort Meade

    Witnesses to testify at Article 32 hearing next month

    By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun
    11:22 a.m. EST, November 21, 2011

    A hearing for Bradley Manning, the Army private accused of giving classified materials about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to WikiLeaks, will be held at Fort Meade next month, his attorney said Monday.

    The primary purpose of the Article 32 hearing is "to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the government's case as well as to provide the defense with an opportunity to obtain pretrial discovery," attorney David E. Coombs wrote Monday on his website.

    The defense may call witnesses and cross-examine the government's witnesses, Coombs wrote. Witnesses are placed under oath, and their testimony may be used during a trial.

    The hearing is scheduled to begin on Dec. 16 and is expected to last five days.

    matthew.brown@baltsun.com

    http://www.twitter.com/matthewhaybrown
  2. Anonymous Member

    This is good... but afterwards, he's back in the brig. Damn it.
  3. The Wrong Guy Member

    Bradley Manning hearing date set as court martial process finally begins

    Manning, accused of leaking secrets to WikiLeaks, to go to pre-trial – known as Article 32 hearing – in Maryland next month

    Bradley Manning, the US soldier who has been held in confinement for the past 18 months on suspicion of having leaked a huge trove of state secrets to WikiLeaks, is to go before a military panel on 16 December at the start of the most high-profile prosecution of a whistleblower in a generation.

    The proceedings, at Fort Meade in Maryland, are expected to last five days, and will be the first opportunity for prosecuting officers and Manning's defence team to present their cases. It is known as an Article 32 hearing, and although it is preliminary, both sides will be able to call and cross-examine witnesses.

    Since he was arrested in Iraq in May 2010, Manning has become a cause célèbre for anti-war and free information advocates in America and around the world. His support network will be calling a rally outside the Article 32 hearing when it opens next month.

    Jeff Paterson, a Manning supporter, welcomed news that the military prosecution was finally getting under way. Since his arrest, Paterson said, Manning has been trapped in a form of legal limbo, with no recourse to any appeals.

    Now there will be a publicly named investigating officer assigned to the case.

    "We will be protesting against the charges levelled at Bradley Manning. If he is proven to have been the WikiLeaks source, then to us Bradley is a hero: he's the most important whistleblower in decades," Paterson said.

    The news of the Article 32 was announced by Manning's lawyer, David Coombs. In a blogpost, he said that the defence would be entitled to call and cross-examine witnesses, each of whom would be placed under oath and whose testimony could be used subsequently in the trial proper.

    Manning has been charged with multiple counts of obtaining and distributing state secrets to unauthorised parties – WikiLeaks, in effect. He is specifically accused of having handed more than 50 of about 150,000 secret US government cables to the whistleblowing website – offences that carry a possible sentence of up to 52 years.

    He has also been charged with "aiding the enemy" – a count that technically carries the death penalty, though military prosecutors have indicated they will be pressing for a lengthy prison term rather than execution in this case.

    The standard of proof in an Article 32 hearing is relatively low, military law experts say. The prosecution has merely to present sufficient evidence to prove there is "reasonable cause to believe" that Manning committed the offences.

    Once the hearing has been completed, a recommendation will be made to a military general who will decide whether or not to proceed to a full trial.

    Philip Cave, a retired navy judge advocate who now works on court martial cases as a civilian lawyer, said the hearing would be a "road bump on the way towards Manning's trial. Does anybody seriously imagine that Bradley Manning isn't going to trial?"

    But the hearing would be significant, Cave said, because it would give the first public indication of the both the prosecution and defence cases.

    More: http://m.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/21/bradley-manning-hearing-date-set?cat=world&type=article
  4. Anonymous Member

    inb4Nixon-Manson: Obama already said this man is guilty.

    I guess no option for a mistrial in this case? I have a working man's knowledge of the law, but not the military code.
  5. The Wrong Guy Member

    m_cetera M
    Julian Assange appeal hearing 5 Dec. Bradley Manning pre-trial hearing 16 Dec. Meanwhile, secret WikiLeaks grand jury continues in Virginia.
    1 minute ago
  6. The Wrong Guy Member


    Uploaded by TheAlyonaShow on Nov 22, 2011

    PFC Bradley Manning, accused of leaking classified information to Wikileaks, will have his first day in court at a pre-trial hearing at Fort Meade, Maryland on December 16th. In the new "We the People" initiative, the White House promised to answer questions that receive more than 5,000 signatures in an online petition. Despite the petition having more than the necessary amount of signatures, on November 18th, the White House gave an official response online sighting that they are required to decline to comment on specific cases in the military justice system. So how much can we expect to learn when the hearing begins? Firedoglake's Jane Hamsher discusses.
  7. Anonymous Member

    This validates my observation in #4 above, FWIW. This is a total doublespeak-1984 response from the White House, as Obama already said that Manning (and Assange BTW) were guilty of high crimes, IOW.
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Anonymous Member

    Also: it's gotta burn old Cold Warrior ass that the real truth comes from Russia these days.
  9. The Wrong Guy Member

  10. Anonymous Member

    Meh. You guys still talking about the traitor?
  11. Anonymous Member

    There is more freedom of press coming from Russia than the USA these days.

    I'll say it again, because I never thought I would see the day.

    There is more freedom of press coming from Russia than the USA these days.
  12. Anonymous Member

    Then you don't have much knowledge of what's happening in russia then.
  13. Smurf Member

    The court won't hear from 50 witnesses. Military courts are much stricter and regulated than civilian courts. I suspect the military judge will limit Manning to no more than 10 live witnesses with the rest made available in sworn affidavits.
  14. The Wrong Guy Member

    Assangeism Assangeism
    Please never sign or start petitions on behalf of WikiLeaks or its people. They are an inconsequential distraction. Lobby decision makers.
    6 minutes ago

    wikileaks WikiLeaks
    Petition sites collect email addresses for their own political or financial purposes. Not to help WikiLeaks. Donate, act or organize.
    6 minutes ago
  15. The Wrong Guy Member

    Write to Bradley Manning | We Meant Well - Peter Van Buren

    Bradley Manning can receive mail and (money order) donations now, with some very specific restrictions/conditions. However, if you wish to contact him you can. Follow the rules on his lawyer’s website.

    After over 530+ days in captivity, Manning gets his first appearance, albeit at a military court, next month. Ironically, the appearance is simply a placeholder formality to determine if grounds exist to move forward. Yeah, right, after all this time, maybe it was all just a mistake, right?

    From my own experience with prison correspondence rules, they are very specific and the people who administer them are very particular. Think about it– that is not a job sought by free spirits and creative thinkers. If the restriction says no more than five pages, they mean it. Prison administrators will either return the entire six page letter to you, destroy it, or at least throw away the last page. Don’t waste time writing in to Bradley’s busy lawyer (as people are doing on his blog) asking about exceptions, or “what five pages” really means.

    Also, prisoners pretty much anywhere can’t receive goods. If you want to help Bradley with pens, stamps or whatever, follow the rules and send him a money order he can use at the prison store.

    The good news is that this means Bradley is aware of the support he is receiving outside, as well as having some minimal situational awareness of what is going on in the world around him.

    More info also from the Bradley Manning Support Network.

    From http://wemeantwell.com/blog/2011/11/22/write-to-bradley-manning/
    • Like Like x 1
  16. 00anon00 Member

    • Like Like x 3
  17. 00anon00 Member

    http://content.usatoday.com/communi...ake-first-wikileaks-court-appearance-friday/1
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world...utors-sights/2011/12/15/gIQA6oLsvO_story.html
  18. 00anon00 Member

  19. amaX Member

    i am bradley manning.
    • Like Like x 3
  20. 00anon00 Member

    related
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/201..._campaign=Feed: theguardian/media/rss (Media)
  21. Anonymous Member

  22. Anonymous Member

  23. 00anon00 Member

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/12/manning-attorney-presiding/
  24. Anonymous Member

    http://blogs.voanews.com/digital-frontiers/2011/12/16/bradley-mannings-day-in-court/
    Theory is Manning's trial is to force him to expose contact with Assange so the US can go after him.
    • Like Like x 2
  25. Rockyj Member

    What is that guy doing?
  26. Anonymous Member

    Lamo, 30, dubbed the "world's most hated hacker" for his role in passing information on Manning to military intelligence after the soldier befriended him on internet chat, said that he understood that Manning was an idealistic young man who believed he could change the world for the better and "who didn't necessarily know what he was doing.
    "I think about him every day. The decision was not one I decided to make, but was thrust upon me."
    • Like Like x 1
  27. Kilia Member

    ....having fun.
    • Like Like x 1
  28. Anonymous Member

    I think Lamo is more into anal penetration with his own skull.
  29. Smurf Member

    Yeah.. sure.. AFTER the world learned what a slime bag he is.
  30. 00anon00 Member

  31. Anonymous Member

    Trial will be a sham.
  32. Smurf Member

    It's obvious the way he responded to cheers yesterday in trial.. dull, flat effect, robotic.. that he's been mistreated.. he's a psychological zombie.. the bastards have worn him down..

    Yeah, he's going to be convicted solely to serve as an example of the U.S. government's bullshit. President Obama has even condemned him. Obama has turned out to be such a fucking wuss.. I regret, now, for voting for him in the first place.

    He, of all people, given his background, should be showing compassion & empathy for Manning.
    • Like Like x 2
  33. Kilia Member

    • Like Like x 1
  34. 00anon00 Member

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/blog/2011/dec/19/bradley-manning-pre-trial-hearing-live-updates
    Lots there including this:
    And they are trying to prove Manning and Julian had direct communication (so Julian can be tried by the US)
  35. 00anon00 Member

  36. 00anon00 Member

    Mods there is another thread on Bradley Manning court December. Can you merge them?
  37. James Spader Member

  38. Smurf Member

  39. Love this reply, so badass. Random XD
  40. The Wrong Guy Member

    US government rests case against WikiLeaks suspect

    United States Army Private Bradley Manning, accused of one of the most serious intelligence breaches in US history, came face-to-face on Tuesday with the man who turned him in to the authorities. The dramatic encounter took place as the government wrapped up its case in a hearing to decide whether Manning, a low-ranking intelligence analyst, should face a court-martial on charges that could send him to prison for life.

    Dressed in a green camouflage uniform of the 10th Mountain Division and wearing black-rimmed glasses, Manning looked on intently as army prosecutors called Adrian Lamo, a former computer hacker, to the stand. Mr Lamo, a figure of some renown in the computer hacker community, recounted how an individual who he said eventually turned out to be Manning reached out to him by email on May 20, 2010.

    Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/World/Story/STIStory_747275.html

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